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Archive for the tag “Materials for Children”

Multimedia Bibliography – Bullying Resources

 by Mary Jane McClendon

Bullying is one of the hardest realities students face. According to a 2011 report issued by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and the National Center of Institutional Statistics, around 28 percent of 12 to 18 year old students reported being bullied at school during the 2009 school year, while 6 percent reported being cyberbullied. Undoubtedly, many more instances go unreported. The purpose of this project is to identify and annotate resources for children and teens who experience bullying, as well as both students and adults who want to ensure a safe, comfortable learning environment for all students. Originally, I intended the bibliography to be dedicated to students, perhaps as a reference that a school librarian or counselor might offer students in need.  However, the further I explored the materials, the more I realized the value of a collective approach to addressing bullying, and that young people are not the only ones who need guidance. In the end, I included organizations and websites that adults would find helpful as well. Because bullying is ubiquitous across age groups, rather than limiting the selection of bullying resources in this bibliography, I have included resources that are appropriate for a range of ages. This list of multimedia resources is intended for elementary, middle school, and high school students, as well as for teachers, parents, and other educational professionals who take part in providing a safe, comfortable learning environment. For each item, I have indicated the age groups appropriate to the resource.

The scope includes websites, organizations, videos, and printed materials related to various types of bullying, including verbal, physical, gender, racial, and bullying associated with sexual orientation. While children may not be dealing with their own sexual identification during early childhood, it is important to remember that they may have parents or siblings that are experiencing issues with sexual orientation and/or bullying.  Cyberbullying is another aspect of bullying addressed by some of these resources. To select materials for this bibliography, I began exploring government and educational websites, as well as review sources such as the American Library Association’s Booklist and School Library Journal.  The ALA’s website offered several lists of recommended bullying resources, including the GLBT Round Table’s “Speaking OUT Against Bullying” list and Helen Foster James’ “Bullies and Bullying” list, which, in addition to professional resources and websites, identifies novels for both younger and older readers that address bullying in their themes. While this is by no means an exhaustive bibliography, I have selected materials which I believe to be relevant, well reviewed, and interesting to both children struggling with bullying and the adults who care about them. Read more…

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Multi-media bibliography on The Great Depression

The purpose of this project is to compile a bibliography of materials related to the Great Depression, including the New Deal and the Dust Bowl. I believe that history is best taught by utilizing a variety of media, including print, film, and audio, including fiction and non-fiction elements. Elementary and middle school history teachers would benefit the most from this collection, as the intended audience is ten to twelve year olds. However, I also believe a public library could use this collection as it would help students with research projects or those simply interested in history. It was difficult to find material on this subject that was directed toward the specified age group, so teachers should be advised to review all content before using it in the classroom, as each teacher and school will have their own standards by which to judge the appropriateness of the content.

Fiction books:

Moss, Marissa. Rose’s Journal: The Story of a Girl in the Great Depression. San Diego: Silver Whistle/Harcourt, 2001. Print.

Though Rose is a fictional character, Moss creates a highly educational and factual book about the Great Depression centered on her. Written in journal form and packed with photographs, doodles, and comics, this book easily captures young readers attentions. Rose’s Journal is filled with pop culture and contemporary news, as well as a realistic account of rural farm life.

Hesse, Karen. Out of the Dust. New York: Scholastic Press, 1997. Print.

When Billie Jo was born, her father hoped for a boy. When he realized she was a girl, he took little notice of her. She eventually wins over his affections by helping with the farming and daily work. When her mother becomes pregnant again, they all wish for a boy to fill the family. However, when the drought strikes and the earth dries up, Billie Jo must learn how to cope with tragedy. Written in beautiful free-verse form, Hesse has created a sad, but realistic view of life during the Dust Bowl.

Non-Fiction Books:

Freedman, Russell. Children of the Great Depression. New York: Clarion Books, 2005. Print.

“His prose is straightforward and easily comprehensible, making sense of even the complexities of the stock-market crash. The use of primary sources is outstanding. This is a book told by chorus, featuring the voices of those who endured the Depression, and is embellished with black-and-white photos by such luminaries as Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Walker Evans, and Russell Lee. Eight chapters cover the causes of the Great Depression, schooling, work life, migrant work, the lives of children who rode the rails, entertainment, and the economic resurgence of the early ’40s.” – School Library Journal

Nardo, Don. Migrant Mother: How a Photograph Defined the Great Depression. Mankato, MN: Compass Point Books, 2011. Print.

“Occasionally, a single photograph becomes the emblematic image that defines an era, and this quality series tells the stories of four of those iconic pictures. Each book places its subject photo in historical context, profiles the photographer, describes the conditions under which it was taken, and analyzes both its immediate and its continuing impact. The texts include ample background information and details and are enhanced by large photos and sidebars. These books will help students understand the influence of the individual images and the eras they epitomize, making them strong choices.” – School Library Journal

Marrin, Albert. Years of dust: the story of the Dust Bowl. New York: Dutton Children’s Books, 2009. Print.

An overview of the Dust Bowl, starting with the history of the great plains and covering the events leading up to the dust storms. Plentiful pictures, sidebars, and maps help grab readers’ attentions. Read more…

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