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Archive for the tag “3rd Grade”

Multimedia Bibliography: Food and Nutrition

Introduction: Since the origin of humanity, food has been an essential component of society. Across centuries families and communities have been “breaking bread” together, so to speak, for centuries, however a shift in American food production in the mid-twentieth century towards a mass production/fast food culture has drastically changed Western society’s eating habits.  Families rush through a drive through for dinner, 5 minute meals cookbooks fly off the shelves in bookstores and libraries, and it has become increasingly common for kids to eat solely pre-packaged, processed  meals. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) obesity amongst children and adolescents has tripled since 1980. Presently, over 17%–or 12.5 million–children in the United States ages 2-19 are obese. These alarming statistics trigger a gamut of questions, two of the most significant being: is there a lack of information on nutrition and healthy eating habits?  Or is there simply a lack of awareness/usage of these nutrition resources? This bibliography targets the latter question by compiling a list of multimedia resources appropriate for middle grade children–examining  text, realia, web and media sources. Cookbooks are included in realia, because the often the best way to demystify healthy food choices is to see, touch,  create and taste  them yourself.

Reference
CDC. “Obesity Rates among all Children in the United States.” Accessed November 22, 2012. http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html/

Target Age: 2nd-5th grade

PRINT

Schlosser, Erick and Charles Wilson. Chew on This: Everything You Don’t Want to Know About Fast Food. Houghton Mifflin, 2007.
Chew on This explores the sinister economic, agricultural and health implications of the fast food industry by recounting the inception and growth of this type of food preparation and distribution. The sheer size (318 pages!) of Schlosser’s and Wilson’s book may intimidate readers; however, its lively tone and stand-alone chapters make this book an engaging read.

Bramwell, Martyn. Food Watch. Dorling Kindersley, 2001.
In true DK fashion Food Watch teems with graphics, text boxes and beautiful full color photographs. Bramwell discusses topics that are deceptively obvious, such as where food really comes from. Targeting the disparity between food scarcity in developing states and the abundance of food in the first world,  Bramwell points out, “Pie eating contests are fun, but only rich people can afford to waste food. Tonnes of unwanted food and packaging are thrown away every day” (13). Food Watch decodes buzzwords readers may be familiar with but not really understand, such as “fair trade, “famine,” “nutritionist,” and includes numerous experiments, such as ripening bananas to look for ethylene that further illustrate Bramwell’s narrative (21). Overall this book is fascinating, frightening and completely on point in regards to the production, packaging and dispersion of food not only in North America but throughout the world.

Goldberg, Jake. Food: The Struggle to Sustain the Human Community. Franklin Watts, 1999.

Goldberg asserts on the dust jacket of his book, “Food is the fuel of human labor, and everything we have accomplished, or failed to accomplish depends upon it.” Because a trip to the local supermarket does little to reflect the story of how food really is grown, produced and distributed–and the impact of these activities on the world–Goldberg delves deeply and eloquently into topics such as the origin of food, agricultural development, food and civilization, hunger and more. This book is relatively lengthy (204 pages) and text heavy, so it would be best for older readers.

Powell, Jillian. Everyone Eats: Rice. Raintree, Steck-Vaughn, 1997.
Powell’s book explores the composition, farming and customs surrounding the world’s second most popular grain: rice (4). Complete with full color illustrations, photographs and recipes this book is an excellent tool to educate young readers a food they may often eat, but know very little about.

Peeples, H. I. Where Does this Come From?: Bubble Gum. Contemporary Books, Inc.
Annotation: This matter-of-fact book draws upon the origins, production and consumption habits of bubble gum. While it does discuss corn syrup and synthetic ingredients Peeples does not delve into the consequences of excessive sugary gum chewing, such as increased risk of cavities. This brief book would be best for younger readers (i.e. 1st-3rd grade). Read more…

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Multimedia Bibliography – Titanic

Introduction

I compiled this bibliographic resource for use by educators, particularly middle grade teachers and school librarians, who wish to present students with an instructional unit on the historical aspects of the Titanic sinking of 1912. The materials selected for this bibliography are suitable for middle grade students (grades 3-6). However, certain materials listed are also acceptable for students as young as the second grade, including the picture books Polar the Titanic Bear and Titanicat. I opted to include these picture books to accommodate younger readers or readers with low reading comprehension skills.

In compiling these resources, I visited several branches of the Austin Public Library to peruse their collections of juvenile materials relating to the Titanic. I also consulted the School Library Journal, which offers reviews of several seminal children’s works about the Titanic sinking. Ultimately, I selected five books which provide insight into varying aspects of the Titanic’s history. A school librarian could use these five books to create a Titanic display for students at a variety of reading levels who are interested in learning more about the Titanic, whetherfor a report, for pleasure, or for both.

Furthermore, I also utilized the internet to locate websites and videos which usefully underpin the books I selected. The “ALSC’s Great Websites for Kids” list provided me with one particularly useful website on the Titanic called “Titanic Destination…Cyberspace.” I also discovered that reputable websites like the History Channel website and the Discovery Channel website have digital content suitable for middle grade students and younger. Having personally visited several Titanic exhibits, I was also aware of several great community resources available for students in the state of Texas. I also chose to include potential field trips, realia, and games in this bibliography because of the value of immersive, experiential learning.

Books

Brewster, Hugh. Illustrated by Ken Marschall. Inside the Titanic (A Giant Cutaway Book). Little, Brown & Company, 1997.

Illustrated by one of the foremost Titanic authorities, this book realistically depicts the experiences of two children who sailed aboard the Titanic in 1912. Impressively sized and richly illustrated, this book will immerse even very young readers in the Titanic’s fateful maiden voyage. The “cutaway” nature of the book’s illustrations allows readers to “explore” the Titanic in a literal way. Readers can view the interior of each deck in vivid detail, from the first-class cabins to the steerage compartments. When presenting a unit on the Titanic, this resource will attract reluctant readers who are turned off by text-heavy books.

Crisp, Marty. Titanticat. Illustrated by Robert Papp. Sleeping Bear Press, 2011.

Jim Mulholland is a cabin boy aboard the Titanic. As the ship prepares for its maiden voyage, Jim is tasked with taking care of the ship’s cat, whom he dubs 401. What follows is a fictionalized version of true events, providing a lighthearted perspective on a usually somber subject. Young readers will delight in this beautifully-illustrated picture book and the whimsical, slightly mysterious story it tells. Rendered in oil on canvas, the cover of this book will add visual appeal to any displays created about the Titanic.

Kentley, Eric. Illustrated by Steven Noon. Story of the Titanic. DK, 2012.

This beautifully-illustrated book tells the story of the Titanic from start to finish. Beginning with the construction of the Titanic in Belfast and concluding with the inevitable legal inquiry which followed her sinking, no detail is spared in describing this important historical event. In addition to key facts, Noon’s artwork includes highly-detailed illustrations, cutaway views, archival and photos. As an oversized book, Story of the Titanic provides more visual detail than the average Titanic book aimed at children, making it an essential addition to any library or classroom collection. Read more…

Volunteering and Philanthropy

Multimedia Bibliography on Volunteering and Philanthropy

While many children’s fiction books feature philanthropy as a theme, non-fiction materials are more difficult to find. Much of the non-fiction focuses on the environment, so this bibliography should help teachers and caregivers develop a more well-rounded selection when teaching about philanthropy. These items are suitable for a range of ages, from 3 to 12, as noted below. I used library catalogs, WorldCat.org, audible.com, and A to Zoo by Caroline Lima to find these items.

Phone and Tablet Apps

Bee Kind. Available from the Apple App Store. Free version.
A cartoon bumblebee teaches you to be kind to yourself and to others. Spin a wheel to generate ideas for good deeds. This creates an interactive To Do List that allows you to check off tasks and add your own. This is a very simple app that has a bright kid-friendly interface. Some tasks may be better suited for parents like “Give money to a charity,” but it works well overall for ages 6 and up.

Dr. Duncan Dog on Duty. By Lisa Dunn-Dern. Illustrated by Andrea Yomtub. E-book app available from the Apple App Store. $0.99.
With charming watercolor illustrations, this interactive e-book demonstrates the power of service. The little girl tells us that even the family pet has a job to do: he is a therapy dog. Readers are introduced to the idea that everyone has talents to share, and one important talent of dogs is their therapeutic presence. Features include read-to-me audio narrated by the pleasant voice of a young girl, auto play, and personalization of narration.

The Berenstain Bears Hurry to Help. Oceanhouse Media. Available from the Apple App Store. $3.99.
The Bear Scouts are earning their Good Deeds Merit Badge in this interactive e-book featuring Christian-oriented themes of philanthropy. The app features professional narration, background audio, and enlarged illustrations. Read to me, read it myself, and auto play.

Doing Good Deeds. Available from the Apple App Store. Written by Umm Ilhaam. $1.99.
Part of Darul Kitab’s Learn About Islam Series, this e-book app for the iPad introduces young children to a variety of good deeds that are in accordance with the Qur’an and Sunnah. Engaging narration accompanies beautiful illustrations.

Mitzvah Hunt. Available from the Apple App Store. Free.
This game app for the iPad features Jewish-oriented philanthropic lessons. Learn to observe the good rather than the bad by tracking the good deeds of others.

Videos

Franklin. / Franklin helps out
Author: Paulette Bourgeois; Brenda Clark; Nelvana (Firm); Family Channel (U.S.); Canadian Television Fund.; All authors
Publisher: [Toronto, Ont.] : Visual Education Centre Ltd., [2009]
Edition/Format: eVideo : Animation : Juvenile audience : English
Summary from WorldCat.org:
Mr. Owl sends his class out into the community to learn first hand, the benefits of volunteer work. By day’s end, Franklin has found jobs for everyone except himself and feels he hasn’t accomplished his goal.

Two Bobbies : a true story of Hurricane Katrina, friendship, and survival
Author: Kirby Larson; Mary Nethery; Jean Cassels; Nutmeg Media (Firm)
Publisher: [S.l.] : Nutmeg Media, [2010]
Edition/Format: DVD video : Juvenile audience : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary from WorldCat.org:
Based on a true story, Two Bobbies takes place in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina when many pets were lost or abandoned. A dog and cat wander together through the devastated city and miraculously survive hunger, floods and other dangers. When they are finally taken to an animal shelter, the volunteers discover that the cat is blind and could not have survived without the dog’s help. Although their owner or owners are never found, the two friends, re-named Bob Cat and Bobbi, find a new home and a happy ending to their ordeal. The story includes an authors’ note and a photograph of the real Bob Cat and Bobbi. Includes a conversation with the authors.

We all contribute & make a difference
Author: Noon E. Productions.; Clearvue & SVE, Inc.
Publisher: [United States] : Clearvue & SVE, [2007], ©2003.
Series: Government & citizenship collection.
Edition/Format: DVD video : Juvenile audience : English
Summary from WorldCat.org:
Illustrates the ways we all can make differences in others’ lives and in our country, and stresses the importance of participating, volunteering, and leading.

Winnie the Pooh: Helping Others. 1988. VHS Video. Also available in four parts on YouTube.
Four classic episodes of the 1990s television series are brought together in this compilation that features the theme of helping friends. The friends help Owl learn to sing, Piglet learn that his small size doesn’t make him any less important, etc. Read more…

Families Text Set (Multimedia Bibliography)

Multimedia Bibliography: Families

by Angela Barratt

Introduction

I set out to create a bibliography for kids to learn about different types of families.  I soon found, however, that aside from picture books there is precious little out there (and even some picture book topics could use expansion).  I hope someday to see better resources for kids (and maybe even help create them?) but for now I have created a guide for adults (parents, teachers, librarians, etc.) to use when teaching children about families.  The bibliography is divided by family type; so if, for example, you are doing a week on adoption you could simply reference that section.  I have tried to be inclusive but it is sometimes difficult to define family types and there is not always good information about them.  The sections I have created are: General Family Diversity, Adoptive/Foster Families, Same-sex Parent Families,  Grandparents as Guardians, and Single Parents, Divorced and Blended Families.  The Web Intro of each section introduces the topic for the adult, while the other resources can be moderated by the adult for use with children.  The resources for kids are most appropriate for grades 1-5, though certain listings may not appeal to the oldest or youngest.

General Family Diversity

Web Intro

Provides an overview of many types of families, including statistics.

Discusses different forms families may take and makes suggestions as to how to talk to kids about them.  While aimed at parents, this is a very useful tool for educators as well.  Presents activities that could be done in the classroom or library.

Coloring Pages

  • Willhoite, Michael. 1991. Families: a coloring book. Boston, Mass: Alyson Wonderland.

There do not seem to exist coloring pages about diverse families online, but this somewhat elusive picture book seems like a great alternative.   It depicts traditional, modern, multi-generational and multi-cultural families as well as same-gender parents.  It was ahead of its time, and I am guessing that’s why it went out of print.  It is still available online through used book retailers for less than $10; my suggestion would be to make copies of the pages for use in the classroom or library.

Picture Books

  • Parr, Todd. 2003. The family book. New York: Little, Brown.

Brightly colored illustrations celebrates the fact that “there are lots of different ways to be a family.”  Depicts families with variations in size, color, parents (gender and number), noise level, eating habits and more but emphasizes that all are families and they still have a lot in common.

  • Moulton, Mark Kimball, and Karen Hillard Couch. 2000. One enchanted evening. Delafield, WI: Lang Books.

Queen Spider and Sir Fieldmouse fall in love at the Annual Midsummer Eve Dance.  The rhyming verse and charming illustrations ask: “why question the happiness true love doth bring?” This is not specifically about one of the types of families, but it does emphasize that love can surprise you and that real love can exist between very different people.

Song

  • Rule, Jim. 1994. “A family is what you make it” in Share this world. Lake Forest, CA: PNO Tuna.

Rule’s song celebrates family differences, stating that he used to believe a family was the stereotypical mom, dad and 2.3 kids but now realizes that that is not the only kind of family.  The album was well reviewed in SLJ: “add this one to your collection.”  Unfortunately unavailable through youtube or other free sites, but available for purchase as CD or digital download on Songs for Teaching website.

Video

• Chasnoff, Debra, Ariella J. Ben-Dov, and Fawn Yacker. 2000. That’s a family! San Francisco, Calif: Women’s Educational Media.

Kids talk about their families in this 35-minute documentary.  Stories include single-parent, mixed race, grandparent guardian and adoptive families as well as same-gender parents and divorced parents.  The online trailer would be great in class as well.  DVD available for purchase as institutional or individual; institutional comes with licenses, discussion and teaching guide.

Web Resource

• Nemours. “Feelings.” KidsHealth. Last modified 2011.

The “My Home and Family” section contains articles like “Living with a Single Parent,” “Living with Grandparents,” “Living with Stepparents,” “Being Adopted” and “Foster Families.” Not an exhaustive resource (contains nothing about same-sex parents), but very informative and reviewed by medical doctors and PhDs.  The articles are written so that any kid could read them, and provide an understanding overview of the topics. Read more…

Multimedia Bibliography – Classical Music

This multimedia bibliography is primarily for teachers (classroom teachers and music specialists) who want to introduce classical music to children in lower and upper elementary school. These resources would also be useful to parents or anyone else interested in the topic, and a few of the resources have elements specifically for children (games, etc.). I have compiled a variety of resources including books, websites and electronic apps, educational programming resources within Austin, and educational and entertaining videos. For the user’s ease, resources are organized by medium. My goal was to create a bibliography that would help teachers plan, implement, and present lessons, and also provide opportunities for students to continue the study on their own. While the items listed vary a great deal in format and content, I believe that they will all be useful in introducing children to classical music and have the potential to inspire a life-long love of beautiful music.

Books

1. Ganeri, Anita. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra. Harcourt Brace & Company, 1996.

Medium: book (informational) and CD

Ages: 8 and up

Benjamin Britten’s orchestral piece, The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra, has been the classic introduction to the symphony orchestra for the past 65 years. Written to highlight individual sections of the orchestra and then weave them together, this piece not only has beautiful music, but also features narration that takes the listener on a tour through the entire orchestra. Anita Ganeri’s book is the perfect complement to the CD of Britten’s music, providing background information, and pictures of, each instrument along with historical background on the orchestra, musical periods, and famous composers. Ganeri also shares examples of different kinds of instruments used in orchestras around the world, gives the reader a peek into the day-to-day life of a professional musician, and includes a glossary of musical terms. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra is the quintessential introduction to classical music and is an excellent resource best used for children in middle to late elementary school.

2. Lach, William. Can You Hear It? Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2006.

Medium: book and CD

Ages: 4 and up

Music often evokes vivid pictures in the mind of the listener, and Can You Hear It? pairs classical works with paintings from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, using art to bring the music to life in a new way. Each musical selection on the CD is accompanied by a full-page image in the book, a brief explanation of the connection between the music and the art, and notes indicating specific things to listen for in the piece. At the end of the book there are notes about the works of art and the artists, as well as the composers. The book also contains descriptions of each instrument in the orchestra and pictures or works of art showing the reader what the instrument looks like. Can You Hear It? is a great tool for expanding on a basic knowledge of classical music and teaching children about the use of imagery.

3. Moss. Lloyd. Illus. by Marjorie Priceman. Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1995.

Medium: book (counting)

Ages: 4 and up

Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin is a counting book in which readers learn about instruments in the orchestra. The story begins with one trombone playing a solo, then a trumpet joins in and they play a duet, and soon there is an orchestra of ten instruments all playing beautiful music together. The text is both creative, using adjectives that mimic the sounds of the instruments, and informative, using musical terms and telling the reader about different parts of the instruments. Colorful illustrations and clever text make this book an enjoyable lesson about instruments.

 4. Ryan, Pam Munoz. Illus. by Brian Selznick. When Marian Sang. Scholastic Press, 2002.

Medium: book (biographical)

Ages: 4 and up

When Marian Sang is the story of Marian Anderson, an African-American contralto widely considered to be one of the most celebrated vocalists of the twentieth century. From singing in church as a child to her historic concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 to her debut with the Metropolitan Opera, Marian Anderson’s story is one of perseverance, triumph, and a remarkable talent and spirit. Pam Munoz Ryan’s text is captivating and moving, and Brian Selznick’s illustrations are rich and emotive. In addition to the story, the book also has notes from the author and illustrator, a timeline of Marian Anderson’s life, and a selected discography of her works. This book would be a wonderful complement to any lesson about classical music in the early and mid-twentieth century, lending a personal and historical element to the subject.

 5. Snicket, Lemony. Illus. by Carson Ellis. The Composer is Dead. Harper Collins Publishers, 2009.

Medium: book (fictional story) and CD

Ages: 4 and up

The Composer is Dead is a silly, yet informative, introduction to the orchestra. In this story, a composer dies and the investigating Inspector goes to the orchestra to find the murderer. He talks to each section – strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion – but they all have alibis. Will he ever solve this musical mystery? In his interrogations, the Inspector learns about the instruments and the role each plays in the symphony, along with other useful information such as musical terminology and a long list of already-dead composers. In classic Lemony Snicket style, the text of The Composer is Dead is clever and fast-paced. Carson Ellis’ watercolor illustrations are fun and full of quirky details. The accompanying CD features a dramatic reading by the author with orchestral accompaniment. With its combination of whimsy and educational information, this book would be a terrific addition to any young music-lover’s library. Read more…

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